REVIEWS



The Thirteenth Mystery — Kids Book Korner

"This book is a sheer delight to read. I loved every minute of it."
— Kids Book Korner



Hocus Pocus Hotel — READKIDDOREAD.com

From best-selling author James Patterson's website READKIDDOREAD.com:

Strange things are happening at the Abracadabra hotel for retired magicians. Two mysteries are revealed, seemingly unrelated — but are coincidences like that possible? It takes the odd pairing of Tyler Yu, the school bully, and Charlie Hitchcock, the kid with a photographic memory to figure things out. Reluctant readers won't have to be coaxed much before they get caught up as clues mount ...but don't quite make sense. The slightly-spooky atmosphere, the unlikely friendship, and a handful of full-color illustrations, deepen the appeal of this first title in the Hocus Pocus Hotel series.
— READKIDDOREAD.COM



Hocus Pocus Hotel — Kirkus Reviews

Ty Yu, one of the biggest bullies in middle school, recruits Charlie Hitchcock and his "acute visual memory" for a little detective work. There have been some mysterious occurrences at Ty's home, the Hocus Pocus Hotel, a residence for retired magicians. His plans to purchase a dirt bike, a "Tezuki Slamhammer 750, Edition 6, in cherry-pop lightning red," must wait when tenant Mr. Madagascar disappears, along with his rent payment. Brack, an employee with some surprises of his own, mentors the students as they connect the clues. Charlie's interests (his skills at Sherlock Holmes Maximum Z serve him well) allow him to quickly summarize the information and bring tidy resolutions. The children's second case involves the identity of a local ghost. The first in a series, these two mysteries connect to a larger storyline as the hotel's performers prepare for their revival show . . . With a touch of The Twilight Zone, it's the building and its guests that provide the eeriest entertainment. (Mystery. 9-12)"
— Kirkus Reviews



Hocus Pocus Hotel — Booklist

A retirement hotel for professional magicians provides the setting for two cases involving mysterious disappearances and a young sleuth with "acute visual memory." Instead of being beaten up, Charlie "Hitch" Hitchcock is surprisingly invited by school bully Tyler Yu into the old hotel run by the surly punkís family to find out where the elderly magician in Room 1413 disappeared to, and then later why shower curtains, bowling pins, and serving spoons have likewise gone missing on another floor that also seems haunted. Getting to the bottom of both mysteries (which turn out to have benign, if contrived, causes) involves sharp observation and deduction as well as plenty of broad hints from the hotelís inscrutable elevator operator. Along the way, Hitch also learns how magicians use swiveling mirrors, legerdemain, and other gear or skills to create their effects. Along with frequent color cartoon renditions of the characters and the hotel's antique, atmospheric decor, Weber provides detailed diagrams to show how each featured trick works. An inviting package.
— Booklist